Wild Fermentation

Wild Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katz is one of our favorite books!

Why? Because fermented foods are good for you.

From the foreword, written by Sally Fallon of the Weston A Price Foundation:

Unfortunately, fermented foods have largely disappeared from the Western diet, much to the detriment of our health and economy. Fermented foods are a powerful aid to digestion and a protection against disease. And because fermentation is, by nature, an artisanal process, the disappearance of fermented foods has hastened the centralization and industrialization of our food supply, to the detriment of small farms and local economies.

There are many things you can learn to ferment from this book, like making beer, wine or vinegar. There are also the standard recipes, like sauerkraut, dill pickles, yogurt, kimchi and kombucha. But the real benefit of this book is learning the technique of fermenting.

For example, it is rather simple to make sauerkraut. You need cabbage, salt and a couple of kitchen tools. That’s pretty much it. Katz takes three pages to explain and discuss this topic. Reading this book, you feel how much he enjoys preparing foods this way.

And if you take the time to read and absorb what he has written, you appreciate it more.

It’s why this is one of our favorite books!

Reading List 2016: Part 2

The list below contains books that we use on a very frequent basis.

Here is Brian’s personal reading list for 2016. He most recently reviewed Talk Like TED by Carmine Gallo.

Reference Resources

Eating on the Wild Side by Jo Robinson

There is so much to learn from this book, it’s hard to pick where to start. If learning about foods, preparing them yourself and doing little things to improve the health impact of a food are important, this book is for you.

Charcuterie by Ruhlman and Polcyn

The fine art and science of curing just about any meat in any way imaginable!

Bones by Jennifer McLagan

Your grandparents can probably relate to many things in this book. And there is a reason they didn’t get sick. Bones are healthy. In this book, there are many ways to prepare bones to extract the goodness from them.

Ruhlman’s Twenty by Ruhlman

The 20 refers to 20 1-word techniques, like think or butter or sauté or sauce. With these 20 techniques, there are 100 recipes.

Odd Bits by Jennifer McLagan

From McLagan about this book: “Most of the meat we eat – the tenderloins, racks, steaks, legs and chops – is only a small percentage of the animal carcass.”

Well, I’m not interested in these cuts and you won’t find them here. This book is about the rest of the animal: The pieces we once enjoyed and relished but no longer bother with.

Textbook of Medical Physiology by Guyton

At one point, this was the number one selling textbook on human physiology in the country. I didn’t know a single graduate student that didn’t have a copy! Whether or not it is still the number one seller, I don’t know. But this book is invaluable as a reference. Plainly written, thorough and easy to understand.

Books on Sports / Exercise Physiology (several of them)

This is the “in motion” or “during exercise” equivalent to the Guyton textbook above.

Countless articles through medical/science/research journals

There is always a stack of these to go through, highlight and either write about or decide if we should make changes to our recommendations.

Reading List 2016: Part 1

Each year I make a list of the books I want to read or reread. I have typically kept this in my notebook or email system – somewhere handy. This year, I’m posting it here on the blog.

This is Part 1 and includes books on my list to read. In Part 2, I list books and other sources that I use daily (or almost daily) as references.

Books to read in 2016

Bad Science by Ben Goldacre

How can you NOT be intrigued by the subtitle alone? I read a lot of research. A lot. And while it can be frustrating to find well-done studies, it is nice to know someone is calling them out.

I first learned of Ben Goldacre through a TEDx talk. This one will give you an idea of what this book is all about.

I’ve read many of his articles, have seen several presentations and have scanned through this book – I’ve had it for four years! So I’m looking forward to reading this book in its entirety.

The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande

Why do I want to read this book? From the inside cover:

The modern world has given us stupendous know-how. Yet avoidable failures continue to plague us… And the reason is simple: the volume and complexity of knowledge today has exceeded our ability as individuals to properly deliver it to people. We train longer, specialize more, use ever advancing technologies and still we fail.

Doing things where failure is not an option, a simple checklist can make all the difference.

Margin by Richard Swenson

Are you busy? Good! Make time to read this book. You can make time by increasing your margin – the space between you and your limits.

Influence by Robert Cialdini

Why and how do people make the decisions they make? How do they justify those decisions? Can any of this be used in our personal or professional lives?

The answer to the last question is yes!

As someone who leads a group, whether it be the team at work, your family or like-minded individuals, knowing the information in this book will help you lead or take them where you want them to go.

Secret Service by John Dijulius III

Customers are the life-line of any business. Happy customers can make a business thrive! One way to get happy customers is by delivering unforgettable customer service.

This is the first sentence from Chapter 4: What are We Really Selling?

The experience is remembered long after the price is forgotten.

What experience do you want people to remember?

Unlimited Power by Anthony Robbins

The copyright on this book? 1985!

No fancy pictures or diagrams. Just 400+ pages of Tony Robbins awesomeness!

This will be my 3rd time through.

Meateater by Steven Rinella

The first chapter in the book:

This book has a hell of a lot going for it, simply because it’s a hunting story. That’s because hunting stories are the oldest and most wide-spread form of story on earth. The genre has been around so long, and has such dep roots, that it extends beyond humans. When two wolves meet up, they’ll often go through a routine of smelling each other’s breath. For a wolf to put his nose to another wolf’s mouth is to pose a question: “What happened while you were hunting?” To exhale is to answer: “You can still smell the blood.”

If that’s not enough to make you want to read the book, I’m not sure there is any help for you! 🙂

Good to Great by Jim Collins

This will be the second or third time to read this book. No explanation needed. Always makes any list of best business books of all time.

The Man Who Swam the Amazon by Martin Strel

Second time to read this book.

People that do things of super-human nature are fascinating. Swimming 3,274 miles on the world’s deadliest river in 66 days qualifies.

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni

Whether you know it or not, you are the leader of a team. The quicker you learn that, the better.

And if you are struggling or wondering why your team is going nowhere, then you need to identify why.